Peasant Bread Three Ways

Peasant Bread Three Ways

Last year was a fun experiment in bread making. I tried a lot of bread recipes, and I was really happy with what I learned. I enjoyed a variety of flavors from sweet to savory to sour, and I figured out how to make decent bread without burning it.

I had to take a pause at the end of the year for personal reasons, but I’m ready to make 2018 a good baking year. I look forward to trying a lot more recipes, and I’ve even made a long list of bread recipes to try in the upcoming weeks.

Although I’m ready to start anew, I’d like to begin this year’s bread recipes with a recreation of an old favorite. No-knead peasant bread was the first bread recipe that I’ve ever successfully made, and it was the first one that made me excited about baking. I loved the flavor and the texture, and I loved that I could make it in a reasonable amount of time with little effort on my part.

With some experimenting, I discovered that peasant bread worked well with three new flavors: rosemary garlic, parmesan oregano, and Italian herb.

Original Recipe

Simple No Knead Peasant Bread With Grapes

In case you missed my original peasant bread recipe, I’ll save you the click and provide the basics here.

Ingredients

  • 2 ¼ Teaspoons Dry Active Yeast (1 Packet)
  • 1 Tablespoon White Granulated Sugar
  • 2 Teaspoons Table Salt
  • 2 Cups Warm Water
  • 4 Cups All Purpose Flour

Additional Equipment

You’ll want to have these items on hand when you make the bread:

You’ll probably have these items in your kitchen already. But if you don’t, I’ve linked you to a few good ones on Amazon.

Instructions

Here’s a quick rundown of what you need to do:

  1. In a large bowl, stir yeast, sugar, and salt in the warm water until all grains dissolve.
  2. Add flour and stir until well incorporated.
  3. Cover and let rise until double in size (about 1 hour).
  4. Tip dough onto lightly greased and floured baking sheet. Divide dough and loosely shape into two rounds.
  5. Let dough rest for 1 hour.
  6. Brush with melted butter.
  7. Preheat oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit and bake for 10 minutes.
  8. Reduce heat to 375 degrees Fahrenheit and bake for another 15 to 20 minutes.

For concision’s sake, I won’t provide step-by-step pictures of the baking process or secrets to success. If you want more details about the original recipe, check out the no-knead peasant bread here.

Rosemary Garlic

Rosemary Garlic Peasant Bread

Once you’ve nailed the original peasant bread recipe, you can take the flavor up a notch with this rosemary garlic peasant bread. It has all the simplicity of regular peasant bread but with a few fun extras.

I paired this bread with a classic crockpot chicken noodle soup (which also featured rosemary and garlic), and it tasted like a match made in heaven. You can also try dipping this bread in olive oil or marinara sauce.

Additional Ingredients

In addition to all the above ingredients for peasant bread, you’ll need these for rosemary garlic peasant bread:

  • 2 Tablespoons Dried Rosemary
  • 1/2 Teaspoon Ground Pepper
  • 1 Teaspoon Oregano
  • 2 Teaspoons Minced Garlic

Just a few extra seasonings and you’re ready to go!

Instructions

Rosemary garlic peasant bread varies a little in the beginning, but it rises and bakes like the original recipe:

  1. In a small bowl, stir yeast, sugar, and in the warm water until all grains dissolve.
  2. In a large bowl, stir flour, salt, rosemary, pepper, and oregano together.
  3. Combine yeast mixture with flour and stir in the minced garlic until everything is incorporated.
  4. Follow steps 3 through 8 in the original recipe.

If you wish, feel free to sprinkle a little extra rosemary on top after you brush your bread with butter. It adds to the flavor and gives your bread a more polished appearance.

Parmesan Oregano

parmesan oregano peasant bread

This is by far my favorite peasant bread variation. It’s easy. It’s tasty. And it pairs well with pasta, though it definitely stands well on its own, too. I’m honestly not sure I want to go back to the original peasant bread after sampling parmesan oregano peasant bread.

Additional Ingredients

Here’s what you’ll need for the bread:

  • 1/3 Cup Grated Parmesan Cheese
  • 1 Tablespoon and 1 Teaspoon Oregano

You’ll also want a little extra parmesan for sprinkling.

Instructions

Not too many variations with this bread here. Still as easy to finish as ever!

  1. In a small bowl, stir yeast, sugar, and in the warm water until all grains dissolve.
  2. In a large bowl, stir flour, salt, parmesan cheese, and oregano together.
  3. Combine yeast mixture with flour and stir until everything is incorporated.
  4. Follow steps 3 through 8 in the original recipe.

Don’t forget to sprinkle a little more parmesan on top of your bread after you’ve brushed it with butter. The extra pinch really helps the parmesan flavor come through, and it adds a nice texture when you bite into it.

Italian Herb

Italian Herb Peasant Bread

Italian Herb combines the flavors of both recipes and, as a result, has a more complex flavor than the other two recipes. It stands well on its own or with pasta. I could not get enough of the smell as I pulled it out of the oven.

Additional Ingredients

Don’t forget these key ingredients:

  • 1/2 Teaspoon Basil
  • 1/2 Teaspoon Oregano
  • 1/2 Teaspoon Marjoram
  • 1/2 Teaspoon Rosemary
  • 1/2 Teaspoon Garlic Powder

And, of course, you’ll want all the ingredients in the original recipe, too.

Instructions

With just a small change in the original recipe, you can enjoy sun-dried tomato and basil peasant bread in a flash:

  1. In a small bowl, stir yeast, sugar, and in the warm water until all grains dissolve.
  2. In a large bowl, stir flour, salt, basil, oregano, marjoram, thyme, and garlic powder together.
  3. Combine yeast mixture with flour and stir until everything is incorporated.
  4. Follow steps 3 through 8 in the original recipe.

If you want, sprinkle a little parmesan on top of your bread after you’ve brushed the top with butter.

Did You Try Them?

My husband and I can’t seem to get enough of peasant bread, so these variations are a great way to switch things up and still satisfy those cravings. I’d love to hear about your bread adventures, though. Did you like these new flavors? Do you have your own variation that you want others to know about? Share your thoughts, comments, and ideas below!